London Marathon 10 Week Countdown – the diary of an injured runner

So as you know I am injured and running is currently out of the window & it looks like that is going to be the case right up until the London Marathon

countdownsnapshot

I was back at the hospital on Friday for the results of my scan, I have been diagnosed with

Mild Achillies Tendinosis

Tear of the medial Gastrocnemius Soleus Junction retracted by 2cm

& a 3cm Haematoma at the site of the tear

meaning that I will be in my cast for the next 4 weeks, I have had two heels placed into the boot, & have been told to try and move a little more and drink more fluids to stop the bleeding turning into a clot but this unfortunately goes against the advice they have given me for the calf tear which is rest, rest & more rest, so the Dr suggested try and do 3x 10 minute walks a day

photo 1 (36)

I left the hospital yesterday feeling deflated, I have had to cancel my spots in two races Brighton Half Marathon and the Lidl Kingston Breakfast Run, I understand that the NHS’s priority is to heal me, not to get me marathon ready, but I was disappointed that physio wasn’t even mentioned until I brought it up & then the comment was we will see how you are in 4 weeks

Image-1

As I am someone who could wallow and get really despondent with things like this I needed something else for me to focus on so I have come up with Project Heal Little Muscle the intention is that no matter what the outcome, I will be the best possible me come marathon day.

Project Heal Little Muscles objectives are to

Walk for 30 mins a day

Eat at least 100gs of Protein a day

Lose Weight

photo 3 (15)

(Saturday 14th February’s food I ate 1185 cals or 28pp and had just over 100gs of Protein)

I have been told that when I can now walk on my foot but that I should still use my crutches for support & to take some of the weight. I thought this would be easier but when I went for a walk this lunchtime I was shocked that it took me nearly 16 mins to walk half a kilometer, later I popped to the supermarket, my husband drove and offered to go in but honestly this was a highlight of my fortnight, I wasn’t giving up the opportunity to get out of the house for 10 mins, as I was dropped off right outside the store I decided to only use one crutch, and while it was physically easier on my hands and upper body and I felt I could move slightly quicker and more freely, I really felt a lot more fatigued after & had to come home & have a nap for half hour

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So my plan is to try and walk a little further each day, yesterday I managed 1,600 steps, today 3,000, by the end of the week I would like to be reaching 5,000 steps a day, the week after 6,000, then 7,000 & hopefully by the time I go back to the hospital in 4 weeks I will be hobbling over 8,000 steps a day (I am going to try and see a Sports Therapist / Physio to ensure that’s ok, I feel I need a second opinion from the hospital and someone who can help me manage my marathon expectations more realistically)

My plan is to do a daily diary on Instagram and a weekly update on here

Finally if anyone lives in the East London/Essex borders & could recommend a good physio I would be really grateful, i’d much rather go on recommendation than a google search

3 thoughts on “London Marathon 10 Week Countdown – the diary of an injured runner

  1. I’m really, really sorry to read about your injuries. I was in a similar position to you last year. I was meant to run the London Marathon but was unable to due to injury. As I had already carried my place over from the previous year (due to another injury) I lost my place. Knowing that I was unlikely to be successful in the ballot I considered using some sort of run-walk-run strategy to get around the marathon but decided not to.

    Back in 2008 I struggled around the London Marathon with an injury (yes I am injury prone) and it wasn’t an enjoyable experience. Being overtaken by thousands of runners was a pretty stressful experience, even starting at the back of the field it was hard to avoid getting in the way of other runners. The London Marathon route isn’t the most scenic and passes through some not so great areas of London. I was heckled by the crowds, the noise became overwhelming and at times felt like giving in (it’s actually pretty hard to leave the course!).

    It took me a long time to recover from run-walking for almost 6 hours on an injured foot, and I suspect my injury problems today are linked to 2008.

    Sorry I’ve posted an essay but seriously weigh up the pros and cons of completing the London Marathon while you are recovering from an injury. All I can say is listen to medical advice (I didn’t!) and learn from my mistakes. If I could rewind the clock, I wouldn’t have attempted London with a broken bone in my foot! There are other marathons and I like to think that one day I will be successful in the London ballot again (I’ve heard that putting down a super speedy/super slow time helps).

    Emma x

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  2. I’m really, really sorry to read about your injuries. I was in a similar position to you last year. I was meant to run the London Marathon but was unable to due to injury. As I had already carried my place over from the previous year (due to another injury) I lost my place. Knowing that I was unlikely to be successful in the ballot I considered using some sort of run-walk-run strategy to get around the marathon but decided not to.

    Back in 2008 I struggled around the London Marathon with an injury (yes I am injury prone) and it wasn’t an enjoyable experience. Being overtaken by thousands of runners was a pretty stressful experience, even starting at the back of the field it was hard to avoid getting in the way of other runners. The London Marathon route isn’t the most scenic and passes through some not so great areas of London. I was heckled by the crowds, the noise became overwhelming and at times felt like giving in (it’s actually pretty hard to leave the course!).

    It took me a long time to recover from run-walking for almost 6 hours on an injured foot, and I suspect my injury problems today are linked to 2008.

    Sorry I’ve posted an essay but seriously weigh up the pros and cons of completing the London Marathon while you are recovering from an injury. All I can say is listen to medical advice (I didn’t!) and learn from my mistakes. If I could rewind the clock, I wouldn’t have attempted London with a broken bone in my foot! There are other marathons and I like to think that one day I will be successful in the London ballot again (I’ve heard that putting down a super speedy/super slow time helps).

    Emma x

    (PS Sorry if I’ve commented twice, WordPress is being a PITA)

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    1. Hi Emma

      Thank you so much for your comment, its probably the last thing I wanted to hear but exactly what I needed to hear if you know what I mean

      I am a big believer in fate & that things happen for a reason so I can’t help thinking that I am being told the London Marathon isn’t for me but at the same time I can’t give up quite yet on that little glimmer of hope

      I am also very injury prone severe ITB issues in 2012, Tendonitis in 2010 just before I done the Moonwalk & I think its that which is giving me a tiny glimmer of hope, I have completed 5 walking marathons before, the first in 2010 after being out with tendonitis for 8 weeks beforehand, & was only given the all clear to try the half marathon 10 days before but stupidity got the better of me so 2 days after getting the all clear to do the half I went out for a 6 mile walk, 2 days after that I walked 20 miles with a few niggles from around 18.5 mile (but my own thought for suddenly changing from road to trails, after my husband and dog joined me for the last mile and half) and a week later I completed the full marathon, touchwood injury free.

      Sunday gave me a reality check, it made me realise this would be a much slower process than I anticipated, I rested again yesterday and today I have done a short 1/2km walk, it took me 17 mins and my leg is aching now, so deep down I think I know I am going to have to follow in your footsteps, but as to when I will be able to say that out aloud is another matter :o)

      But I promise you I will not do anything stupid, I will not put myself on that start line unless I know I can complete the course without injurying myself further

      xx

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